${{amount}}

The Comprehensive Guide to Electric Scooter Laws

  • Read Time: 13 min

With the arrival of the electric scooter, and in particular the various share companies, the e-scooter has become very popular and is fast growing as a practical environmentally friendly means of personal transport.

With the increase in users, lawmakers need to address several areas regarding the use of e-scooters.

This is an ongoing process where regions, states, and countries have different laws regarding electric scooters.

Answering the question if riding an e-scooter in your particular area is legal is not so easy to do. Trying to find the correct information online is a challenge and in some cases, there is conflicting information on what is legal in that particular state.

F.e. if a license is needed or not, or if helmets are required. We have to the best of our ability tried to cover each state as correctly as we can. When we have found conflicting information you will see it mentioned in that particular state's info and the letters (ci) after the state's name in the heading.

Furthermore, laws are subject to change which is an ongoing process. What we list below is what the law says at the time of writing, which is April of 2022.

The only way to be 100% sure is to keep an eye on any news or updates specifically for your region.

Bear in mind that the list below shows each state's current legislature.

Every state might have cities where the local councils prohibit or limits the use of e- scooters in certain areas or ban them completely.

There might also be differences between rental and private-owned scooters.

electric scooter laws

Speed Limit

The current max speed limit for most states is 20 mph (32 kph). A bit unexpected as most share scooters are regulated to do 10-15 mph (16-24 kph).

There are some exceptions. In DC the max speed is 10 mph (16 kph) while in New Jersey it's 19 mph (30 kph).

In Michigan and Oregon 25 mph (40 kph).

Alabama

You must have a Class M, or a B restricted motorcycle license to ride an e-scooter in the state of Alabama. You need to be minimum 14 years of age to be able to apply for this license.

The helmet law also applies to e-scooters as these vehicles fall under the definition of "electric bike". As per these laws, you must wear a protective bicycle helmet when operating an e-scooter if you are below the age of 16.

E-scooter riders are required to drive on the right side of the road when riding on the streets.

Regulations vary from city to city though. Auburn and Tuscaloosa have banned e-scooters on the streets. In Birmingham, they fall under the category of motor vehicles, which will require a registration tag as well as a motorcycle license.

Alaska

You need to be a minimum of 14 years old and have an M2 class motorcycle license. From 16 years and up you need an M1 or M3 license.

Any rider under 18 years must wear a helmet.

Electric scooters that you can sit or stand on are not allowed more than a 750W motor. Other than that you can ride under the same regulations as the regular motor vehicle rules. The streets are ok.

Arizona

Arizona defines electric scooters as devices that:

- Has a max weight of 75 lbs (34 kg)
- Has two or three wheels
- Has a handlebar, and floorboard used for standing on while riding
- Powered by an electric motor
- Maximum top speed of 20 mph (32 kph)

In 2019 a bill was passed that legalized the use of e-scooters in public areas at the state level. Sidewalks and public roads are ok for electric scooters.

No helmets are required statewide except for Tucscon, Sierra Vista, Yuma, and Pima counties where riders under 18 years of age must wear a helmet.

Arkansas

Arkansas is similar to Arizona. Their definition of an e-scooter is a device that:

- Weighs less than 100 lbs (45 kg)
- Has two or three wheelsHas a handlebar, and floorboard used for standing on while riding
- Powered by an electric motor
- Maximum top speed of 20 mph (32 kph)

Operators must be a minimum of 16 years old, and although the permitted top speed of the vehicle is 20 mph (32 kph), you are not allowed to ride faster than 15 mph (24 kph).

At the time of writing, as far as the legality of riding on streets, sidewalks, as well as other regulations, is left to local authorities.

Some info says license and registration are required and some say it's not.

California

California, the home of surfers and skaters, should be great for e-scooters no?

Not so much. You can ride on bike lanes and public roads if you don't exceed 15 mph (24 kph).

Any riders under 18 years of age must wear a helmet. A valid driver's license or learner's permit is also required.

You need to wear a helmet if you ride on the streets.

But why is California so strict? It started more relaxed and was in fact the birthplace of the share scoter industry. But in 2018, three companies, Bird, Lime, and Spin, launched without the authority's permission. E-scooters quickly gained a bad reputation and new e-scooter laws were put in place.

Colorado

The e-scooter seems to be popular in Colorado. At least from a regulatory perspective.

E-scooters are allowed on streets with a speed limit of 30 mph (48 kph) or less. The same laws and regulations apply to bicycles.

You can ride on sidewalks but at a maximum of 6 mph (10 kph). Riders must be at least 16 years old to ride and under 18:s must wear a helmet.

The top speed allowed is 20 mph (32 kph).

Some info says a license is required and some say it's not.

Connecticut

Some e-scooter laws were enforced in 2019 in Connecticut. They are very similar to existing bike laws and make it relatively easy to use your e-scooter.

You need to be a minimum of 15 years of age to operate one and if you are under 16 years you must wear a helmet. It is not allowed to ride on the sidewalk, and the maximum speed limit is 20 mph (32 kph).

Some info says a license is required and some say it's not.

Delaware

Some info says e-scooters are completely banned in Delaware and other info claims it depends on what type of motor-driven vehicle it is.

That info states the following:
Delaware defines a motorized scooter as follows.

- It must have two wheelsIt must have a chassis/standing floorboard close to the road
- Be operated by standing or sitting on it
- Featuring handlebars or a throttle/brake controlled by hand
- It must be propelled through a motor without human intervention

Motor-driven vehicles with the attributes described above do not fall under the category of motorcycles; therefore, you do not need to register them with the Delaware DMV. Furthermore, other vehicles such as mopeds or tripeds also have a separate class. 

With that being said, if you have a low-end scooter, it may be classified as what Delaware DMV refers to as a minibike. The criteria for this class are given below.

- It must have a wheel diameter of fewer than 10 inches
- It must be shorter than 40 inches in length
- It shall have an engine displacement smaller than 45cc
- The driver’s seat must be positioned less than 25 inches away from the ground

If you find that your scooter checks these boxes, then you have a minibike on your hands. Similar to scooter regulations, you do not need to register minibikes either.

District of Columbia or Washington D.C.

In Washington DC, a law was passed in 2020 defining the e-scooter as a "PMD", Personal Mobility Device. This means a type of motorized vehicle designed for one-person transport only. No need for a license, or any other type of registration but there are other restrictions.

The minimum age to operate an e-scooter is 16 years.

You are not allowed to ride on sidewalks.

Riders above 18 years old do not need to wear a helmet on share scooters.

You can ride in all designated bike lanes, but you are not allowed to wear headphones.

Scooter riders must obey all road rules and traffic signals.

And the really important and slightly disappointing one, the max speed allowed is 10 mph (16 kph). This was developed with share scooters in mind. It heavily restricts private owners though.

Florida

The first thing to remember regarding Florida and e-scooters regulations is that e- scooter riders, on a state level, have the same rights and responsibilities as bicyclists have, including the right to use bike lanes. However, the rest of the regulations are left up to local cities and their officials to decide. So it can vary a lot regarding the use of helmets, where you can ride, and so on.

But generally, Florida is a good place to own and ride an e-scooter. The minimum age to ride one is 16 years old and no license is required.

Riding in bike lanes is allowed and you must follow all the road rules.

The max speed allowed is 30 mph (48 kph) but not in bike lanes.

Georgia

Georgia has stated that they don't want to over-regulate the industry in an attempt to encourage more development of this kind of technology. More specific laws regarding e-scooters are left up to local cities.

You can ride on bike paths, bike lanes, and on roads with a 35 mph (56 kph) speed limit or less. Sidewalks and crosswalks are not allowed.

The electric scooters allowed max speed is 20 mph (32 kph) and its max weight is 100 lbs (45 kg).

There is no minimum age requirement but, any rider under 16 must wear a helmet.

Texting while riding is not allowed, and e-scooters must follow the traffic rules.

Some info says license and registration are required and some say it's not.

Hawaii

Hawaii is catching up. Which makes sense in such an environment. But laws have been lacking up til now and e-scooters were regulated as mopeds and therefore illegal to ride on sidewalks f.e.

New laws in place as of July 2021, states that any rider must be a minimum of 15 years of age to ride on public property. And anyone under 16 must wear a helmet with a chin strap.

You must wear safety goggles or install a face shield on your scooter.

It is still illegal to ride on sidewalks.

Each respective county will have rules as to how and where you can ride.

Some info says license and registration are required and some say it's not.

Idaho

Another state that has conflicting info on if e-scooters are even legal or not.

Idaho’s legal policies concerning electric scooters can be very confusing.

The problem is there is no specific distinction between them and motorcycles. Other motor-driven vehicles such as scooters are bunched together and referred to as "motorized toys".

You have to match the following criteria, describing motorcycles, otherwise, you will be considered to have a motorized toy.

- The vehicle shall have a 50cc engine
- Have two wheels for travel
- Be self-propelled without human assistance

Falling short of this, you are considered to have a motorized toy and unfortunately not allowed to operate it on public roads. The State of Idaho does not consider motorized toys to be manufactured for public road use. Therefore there is no need for registration and license.

If you are unsure of what type of vehicle Idaho considers you to have, the best thing is to contact your local DMV office to find out.

In Idaho, e-scooters are street legal and are not considered motor vehicles. No license, registration, or title is needed to ride.

Boise is the one city that has regulations in place though.

E-Scooters can be used within the City of Boise limits in the following locations:

- Streets
- Sidewalks and crosswalks
- In bike lanes
- On the 25 miles of Greenbelt paths managed by the City of Boise

How to park and specific no-ride zones are also listed.

No-ride zones:
- Parts of Boise State University
- Boise Skate ParksIdaho State Capitol (No Park Zone)
- Boise Foothills
- Kathryn Albertson Park

Illinois

The minimum age is 16 years old to ride, and you need either a driver's license, instruction permit, or state identification card if you are under 17.

An e-scooter is defined as a vehicle that:

- Can go 20 mph (32 kph) but not faster than 20 mph (48 kph)
- has a maximum power output of 1,5 kW (2 hp)
- Can be powered like a motorcycle or pedaled by foot
- Doesn't have a system that requires shifting gears

If it deviates from any of these criteria it is considered a motorcycle and must be registered. Headlight visible from 500 feet and taillight visible from 100-600 feet is mandatory.

You can ride on public roads unless local laws impose limitations.

No helmets are required.

A bill is currently being introduced but has yet to take effect. If it does, it means that e-scooter users should follow the same rules of the road as bicycles.

Indiana

New laws as of July 2019 specifically for e-scooters say a vehicle is considered an "electric foot scooter" if it meets the following criteria:

- Has handlebars and a floorboard to stand on while riding
- Weighs 100 lbs (45 kg) or less
- Has three or fewer wheels
- Has a maximum top speed of 20 mph (32 kph) or less on flat ground

If it does, it has the same rights and responsibilities as bicycles.

However, the following info can also be found.

Indiana categorizes scooters, mopeds, and motorcycles in the same group known as motor-driven cycles. There are different classes of these cycles and different rules and regulations apply.

Class A and B both have registration and license required.

Helmet required for anyone under 18 years.

Iowa

A bill was introduced in 2019 by the Iowa state senate (still not acted upon) defining e scooters as such vehicles if:

- They weigh less than 100 lbs (45 kg)
- Are equipped with two or three wheels
- Have handlebars and a floorboard
- If they are powered by an electric motor with a top speed of under 20 mph (32 kph)

If passed, the bill proposes that e-scooters will follow the same rules as bicycles allowing them on roads, bike lanes, and sidewalks.

Some info states that license, registration, and insurance are needed same as for a motorcycle.

Kansas

Kansas has legalized electric scooters at the state level. No helmets are required, and it is not allowed to ride on sidewalks or highways.

Some info says you need a valid driver's license and register your electric scooter and some say you don't.

Kentucky

Kentucky only has a formal definition for mopeds and does not officially classify e-scooters in general.

They consider a moped to be:

- A vehicle with a 2 hp engine
- Automatic transmission, no manual shifting by the driver
- Max speed of 30 mph (48 kph)

Falling short of this criteria, you have what's considered a motor-driven cycle in Kentucky. And these are sadly not allowed on public roads. If it does fill the criteria, you need to register it, and some important credentials are needed for a license that is only available for 16 years or older.

Then you can find the following info:

Electric scooters are treated the same as bicycles under Kentucky law and allow to be used on public streets following the same rules as bicycles.

No requirements for registration or purchase insurance. No driver's license is needed, as well as no requirement for helmets.

Users must be at least 16 years of age.

The e-scooter must, however, be equipped with a headlamp and rear red light for dark or nighttime riding as well as low visibility such as fog and/or rain.

Louisiana

In Louisiana, electric scooters are defined as devices that:

- Weighs less than one hundred pounds 100 lbs (45 kg)
- Has a handlebar and a floorboard
- Is powered by an electric motor or human power
- Has a maximum speed of 20 mph (32 kph)

Louisiana legalized electric scooters at the state level in 2019. Under the legislation, it is allowed to ride on sidewalks, bicycle paths, and streets with a speed limit of 25 mph or less.

Anyone under 17 must wear a helmet and only one person at a time can ride the scooter.

Some info states you need a license, and that the allowed max speed is 40 mph.

Maine

Electric scooters are legal in Maine but specific laws regarding e-scooters have been reapplied to similar motor vehicles such as mopeds.

A motor scooter is defined by the following:

- A vehicle with two or three wheels less than 10 inches in diameter
- A gas-powered motor with less than 25CC:s or an electric motor with max 750W

You need some sort of driver's license, permit, or other endorsement and do not need to register it. No helmets are required.

For night riding the scooter must be equipped with a white front headlight, a rear red light as well as reflexes/reflectors. The fastest you are allowed to ride is 20 mph (32 kph).

Maryland

A bill was passed in 2019 which defines stand-up e-scooters as their own class of vehicle. The bill established that low-speed electric scooters are considered bicycles as per Maryland vehicle law and can only have a max speed of 20 mph (32 kph).

Bike paths are to be used when possible and they are also allowed on roads and sidewalks.

All other rules of the road apply. Stop signs, riding on the right side of the road, signal to turn, etc.

Helmet required for all riders under 16 years of age.

License needed or not is unclear at the time of writing.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts groups e-scooters with motorized scooters i.e.mopeds. This would require an electric scooter rider to wear a helmet as well as have a driver's license and never exceed 20 mph (32 kph). And follow all other rules of the moped laws.

Other info states that a lightweight motorized scooter is considered a personal micro-mobility vehicle and is limited to a top speed of 15 mph (24 kph) and that helmets are not required.

Michigan

Michigan classifies and treats electric scooters under the same category as electric skateboards. These are not classified as motor vehicles but must in all other ways follow the rules applicable to a driver of a vehicle.

They cant have a motor with more than 2500W (which should be plenty enough) and the max speed allowed is 25 mph (40 kph).

E-scooters are only allowed on streets with speed limits of less than 25 mph (40 kph).

Anyone under the age of 19 must wear a helmet and anyone under 12 can not operate an e-scooter on public streets. Riding on sidewalks is allowed unless other restrictions are in place.

Minnesota

Minnesota categorizes electric scooters as "motorized foot scooters" that a rider can stand or sit on, have handlebars, wheels no larger than 12 inches in diameter, are powered by an electrical motor or combustion engine, and has a max speed of 15 mph (24 kph).

Helmets are required for anyone under 18 years of age and you must be at least 12 years old to operate one.

Electric scooters have the same rights and responsibilities as bicyclists.

You can ride them on highways and streets without a driver's license, registration, and insurance.

Sidewalks are not allowed.

For dark and otherwise reduced visibility riding, it is mandatory with a headlight and taillight meeting the Department of Public Safety Standards.

Other info states that the max speed allowed is 30 mph (48 kph).

Mississippi

In Mississippi, electric scooters or "Electric Stand-Up Scooters" are defined as devices that:

- Weighs less than 100 lbs (45 kg)
- Has two or three wheels
- Has a handlebar and a floorboard that can be used to stand on while riding
- Is powered by an electric motor
- Has a maximum speed of 20 mph (32 kph)

Same laws and responsibilities apply as those of a bicyclist. Bike paths, sidewalks, and other streets or locations that allow bicycles are also ok for e-scooters.

The max speed allowed is 15 mph (24 kph) and you must be the same age sufficient as when operating an automobile.

No state law requires helmets and a driver's license at the time of writing.

Missouri

Classified the same as e-bikes and can be operated in streets and bike lanes. A driver's license is required. Operators must be minimum of 16 years old and wear a helmet. If it goes above 30 mph (48 kph) it will be regulated as a motorcycle.

Other info states that a rider must be 18 and hold a valid driver’s license

Montana

Montana regulates electric scooters as "motorized bicycles". Riding on sidewalks is not allowed. Pedestrians always have the right of way. An e-scooter rider must give a verbal warning before passing pedestrians and obey all other traffic rules.

Nebraska

Not much can be found by way of legislation regarding e-scooters legality in Nebraska. Nebraska DMV states that they don't need to be registered.

Riding on sidewalks is prohibited and all other standard laws must be followed.

No current helmet or age restriction at the state level.

Nevada

Electric scooters are legal in Nevada.

They cant weigh more than 100 lbs (45 kg), must not exceed a max speed of 20 mph (32 kph) and the rider must be a minimum of 16 years old.

They are allowed in bike lanes, paths, and other types of roadways where they are not allowed to go faster than 15 mph (24 kph). No helmets are required on a state level.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire categorizes electric scooters as e-bikes; therefore, all the rules that apply to bicycles also apply to e-scooters.

A braking mechanism is mandatory by law.

You must be minimum 16 years of age to operate an e-scooter.

Yet, the following info can also be found.

No statewide law exists for electric scooters in New Hampshire. Some local cities such as Nashua and Portsmouth, have passed regulations specifically concerning shared fleet scooters.

New Jersey

As expected, New Jersey does have legislation since May of 2019 regarding electric scooters. They are specifically categorized as "low-speed" electric scooters that you can stand on, has handlebars, and must not exceed a top speed of 20 mph (32 kph). They must adhere to the same rules of the road as bicycles.

Whether they are allowed on sidewalks and trails, is left to the various cities and municipalities. There is no need for a valid driver's license, insurance, or vehicle registration.

Helmets are required for anyone under 17 years of age.

New Mexico

In New Mexico, you have to inquire locally as at the moment there are no state-level formal legislative policies about electric scooters. A bill was introduced in January 2019 with a regulatory framework but no further action has been taken.

New York

New York will always be New York. This is certainly a place where the electric scooter would show its advantages. Approximately 50% of car trips in the U.S. are under three miles, and nowhere is this more true than in New York where many trips are very short, yet can drive any person insane from the maddening congestion.

So it was welcomed when the state of New York legalized e-scooters in August 2020 helping micromobility and the city at the same time.

Before this, it was the "wild wild east" let's say, as unregulated personally-owned e-scooters were roaming free and share scooters were banned.

But now rules are in place.

At the state level, riders must be minimum of 16 years old and wear a helmet if under the age of 18.

Riding on sidewalks is not allowed. Streets with a posted speed limit of more than 30 mph (48 kph) are also a no-no.

However, cities and municipalities have the right to override these laws or extend them. In November 2020, New York City passed a regulation applying to the five boroughs that opened up its permit process for five privately owned share scooter companies starting in March of 2021.

The max speed limit is 20 mph (32 kph).

North Carolina

Electric scooters are considered motor vehicles in NC and must be registered with the DMV. Riders must have a valid NC driver's license or id card. They fall under the definition of a moped which includes heavier vehicles that can travel up to 30 mph (48 kph).

E-scooters are only allowed on streets with a speed limit of 25 mph (40 kph) or less.

Any rider must be a minimum of 16 years of age and wear an FMVSS 218 (motorcycle standard) helmet.

North Dakota

Similar to North Carolina, e-scooters are grouped with mopeds. The max speed allowed is 30 mph (48 kph). Any rider under the age of 18 must wear a motorcycle helmet. Bike paths and sidewalks are not allowed.

The e-scooter must have brakes, a headlight, and a taillight.

The minimum age for operating one is 14 years.

Ohio

Ohio passed state laws in January 2021 which regulate and legalize electric scooters as "low-speed micro-mobility devices".

They must not exceed 100 lbs (45 kg) in weight and 20 mph (32 kph) in top speed.

No license, insurance, or registration is needed. Permitted on public roads but must yield to pedestrians and have front and rear lights at night. No helmet is required.

16 is the minimum age required to ride one.

All other rules of law apply and parking is only allowed in areas where it doesn't impede traffic.

Oklahoma

Individual cities regulate the e-scooter laws in Oklahoma since there is no statewide law in effect. So f.e. under Oklahoma City ordinance, anyone under 18 years of age operating an electric scooter must wear a helmet. The minimum age of riders is 16 years and there is no need for a driver's license or vehicle insurance.

Riding in bike lanes is allowed on roads with a 35 mph speed limit. However, the top speed allowed on such roads is 25 mph.

All other standard traffic rules apply.

Oregon

Oregon follows the path of some other fellow states and regulates the e-scooter under clarified guidelines within the category of moped laws.

Riding on sidewalks and crosswalks is prohibited. Operators must be 16 years old and helmets are required for all riders regardless of age.

Roadways are allowed but highways are not. Using turn or hand signals is mandatory.

Portland, as the largest city in Oregon, does not allow scooters on sidewalks and requires that riders can not exceed 15 mph (24 kph).

Pennsylvania

No fun for e-scooter fans in Pennsylvania. They are considered under the same standards as motor vehicles and as such, do not meet the equipment and inspection requirements.

A guideline bill was introduced in 2019 but has not yet been acted upon.

They can be registered if they meet all the criteria of a motor vehicle, fenders, turn signals, lights, etc. Since few e-scooters would meet the exact criteria, they are considered illegal.

Rhode Island

There is no electric scooter state legislation in RI but instead, local cities have their respective rules. The only way to know what the law says is to check with your respective municipality.

The City of Providence f.e. requires a valid driver's license or municipal ID.

Riders are encouraged to wear a helmet and ride slowly. Riding on sidewalks and streets is allowed as long as all traffic rules are obeyed.

South Carolina

Similar to Rhode Island. No statewide laws regulate e-scooters but allow cities to self-regulate. Which has resulted in Charleston and Columbia banning electric scooters in 2018/2019 respectively which is still in effect.

The closest one can get to understand what rules apply, lies under gas-powered moped laws.

As such, all vehicles falling under that category must be registered and insured as motorcycles.

A class D, G, or M driver's license is required to operate a moped and it can not exceed 25 mph (40 kph). Anyone under the age of 21 must wear a helmet on a moped or motorcycle.

Check with local authorities for further information.

South Dakota

No fun here. Again no statewide laws regarding e-scooters but...it falls under moped laws. This means e-scooters have requirements such as mirrors, lights, brakes, insurance, and DMV registration.

Riders must carry a valid driver's license and at all times wear eye protection. Anyone under 18 is required to wear a helmet.

All other rules of traffic apply.

Tennessee

As of 2019, Tennesse passed legislation regulating electric scooters in the same category as e-bikes and defines e-scooters as a vehicle that can't weigh more than 100 lbs (45 kg), with a max speed of 20 mph (32 kph), has a handlebar and an electric motor. They must have front and rear lights as well as brakes.

Texas

No specific electric scooter laws exist in Texas, but there are guidelines of sorts. The DMV rules for "motor-assisted scooters" meaning mopeds are where one needs to look.

Under these regulations, it is not allowed to ride on roads with a greater speed limit than 35 mph (56 kph), and the power is limited to 750W. Riding on sidewalks and other roads is legal. No helmets are required.

No need for registration, license, or insurance.

At the time of writing, it seems relatively unlikely that Texas will induce state-wide regulations, but rather leave it to local municipalities and cities to decide for themselves.

Utah

Utah has regulations in place which effectively treat e-scooters as bicycles.

Thus there is no need for licensing, or registration. It is legal to ride scooters everywhere that bikes are allowed if the road speed limit is 25 mph (40 kph). The e-scooter however must not exceed 15 mph (24 kph).

Riders under the age of 15 must be under direct supervision by a parent or other guardian.

Vermont

No state-wide regulation but local rules and guidelines exist in Vermont. Burlington f.e. has a speed limit of 15 mph (24 kph) which is set mainly with share scooters in mind.

E-bikes and e-scooters are treated as vehicles and must ride on roadways and are not allowed on sidewalks.

For all other purposes, current law states that motor-assisted bicycles are governed as regular bicycles and operators shall follow the same rules and regulations. The assumption is that the same applies to e-scooters for now.

Virginia

Virginia has legislation in place as of July 2020. It states an e-scooters max net weight at 100 lbs (45 kg), its top speed at 20 mph (32 kph), and the minimum age of operation is 14 years.

Riding on highways is prohibited.

The law also permits counties and cities to regulate or ban micro-mobility vehicles via local ordinances.

Washington

In May 2019 Washington passed e-scooter legislation legalizing scooters and specifying them as "motorized foot scooters".

A max speed of 15 mph (24 kph) is allowed on bike lanes and streets.

Lights are mandatory when riding at night. Those under 16 years of age can only ride if the local jurisdiction expressly allows it as is riding on the sidewalk.

Helmets are not required for those above 18 years but are strongly suggested.

Anyone under 16 must wear a helmet.

West Virginia

A bill was passed in 2020 regarding e-bikes but nothing yet for e-scooters. The suggested guidance from the State of West Virginia is that e-scooters would fall under the same category as e-bikes.

The new law does not require e-bikes to be registered, insured, or demand a driver's license. The e-bikes must follow the same rules of the road as bicycles and all riders under 15 must wear a helmet.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin is similar to many other states when it comes to regulating electric scooters.

An e-scooter is defined as a device that weighs less than 100 lbs (45 kg), has a max speed of 20 mph (32 kph), has a handlebar, can be used to stand on while riding, and is powered by an electrical motor.

They are not allowed on sidewalks and riders must follow the same rule of the roads as bicyclists.

The bill also permits local governments to regulate shared scooter operators and set their own rules on scooters within their jurisdiction.

No statewide requirement for helmet or license.

Wyoming

No specific electric scooter laws yet in Wyoming but the state did pass a law in 2019 granting e-bikes the same privileges as bicycles as well as defining a few different types of lighter personal vehicles.

There is a section covering scooters, however, it can easily be interpreted as referring to mopeds.

As per the law, e-bikes and electrical skateboards do not need licensing or registration. Under this law, scooters are regulated as electrical skateboards and have the same rights as e-scooters.

Help us

If you notice anything incorrect, please send us a message and let us know. The laws are under constant revision and changes will take place. We will review and update if and when necessary to help as many as we can to be correctly informed.

*Disclaimer: Fluidfreeride has used the best efforts and information available at the time of writing but does not in any manner guarantee the accuracy of the electric scooter laws in the US or internationally. Any person using or riding an electric kick scooter must refer to local governments and authorities to get the latest updated information as to the legal standing on the usage of an e-scooter in that region.

WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
WideWheel PRO - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid CityRider - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
fluid HORIZON - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
MANTIS V2 - fluid Edition - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
Wolf Warrior 11 - fluidfreeride.com
ModelWideWheel Pro CityRiderHorizonMantisWolfWarrior
Top Speed26 Mph18 Mph
25 Mph40 Mph50 Mph
Motor1000watt300watt500watt2000watt2400watt
Range22 Miles10 Miles25 Miles45 Miles70 Miles
Weight54 lbs28.5 lbs42 lbs65 lbs101 lbs
Buy NowBuy NowBuy NowBuy NowBuy Now